Happy Birthday, America! From St. Joseph, Michigan

July 5, 2015

After a fantastic weekend at the Fitbloggin’ conference in Denver, I continued east, ending up in St. Joseph, Michigan, a town on Lake Michigan with gorgeous, sandy beaches. My mom grew up in this area, and it’s the perfect place for our family to meet up for a relaxing week.

David-Slide

Oh, by the way, I’m writing this from  Terminal 3 at O’Hare, where my flight home has been delayed over two hours. It’s a faint smudge on an excellent week, and, in all honesty, if my flight was on time I wouldn’t have gotten this post up for another day… so my flight delay is your gain! You’re welcome! Read the rest of this entry »


LISTEN UP! My ‘Everyday Runners’ Podcast is Live!

February 26, 2015

Greetings from Michigan! I arrived yesterday, and I’m so excited to see snow.

snow-in-hand

I know there’s millions of you all over the east and midwest that have suffered through a horrible winter and can’t wait for the spring to come, but for this California resident, snow is Read the rest of this entry »


Hello from Michigan!

December 22, 2014

I’m back in my home state for Christmas, and having a great time. Finished my Christmas shopping, been hanging out with friends, helping my parents with cooking and cleaning. And my parents have a whole slew of new neighbors:

Deer-on-grass

There are deer everywhere. We never used to Read the rest of this entry »


A Few Days on Mackinac Island

July 7, 2014

I’m baaaaack! Hope you all had a great Fourth of July week. Mine was wonderful – I spent it hanging out with family in Michigan, where I grew up, visiting places we used to go to all the time when I was a kid.

First stop: Mackinac Island. Located in the very northern part of Lake Huron, Mackinac Island is known for a few things: its history, its ban on motor vehicles (which means bikes and horses are the main means of transportation), and its many fudge shops. As many brochures and websites point out, visiting Mackinac Island is like stepping back in time – specifically, to the late 1800s, when many of the island’s buildings were constructed.

The island is only accessible by ferry, and my in-law Anne took this great picture of me as we pulled away from the mainland.

David-Ferry

We used to go to Mackinac Island every Read the rest of this entry »


Christmas and New Years Recap 2012

January 6, 2013

Howdy folks. I don’t think I’m 100% better yet, but I’m feeling like this cold is definitely on its way out. Time to fill you in on my holiday adventures! As I mentioned in my last post (with much excitement and perhaps an exclamation point or two), I managed to make it through my holiday travels without gaining any weight. I made a concerted effort to make healthy choices and stay active, while still enjoying some of the pleasures of the season.

I’ll start with exercise. No, on second thought, I’ll start with what I was most hoping for: A white Christmas! There wasn’t a speck of snow on the ground when I landed in Michigan on the 23rd, but it started snowing in the late afternoon on Christmas Eve, and by Christmas morning, there was a nice white blanket covering everything in sight.

IMG_5161

It snowed more the next couple days, and I loved being back in winter weather, if only for a little while!

Moving on to exercise! Read the rest of this entry »


Finger Limes and Calamondin

December 25, 2011

I hope everyone had a lovely Christmas! Mine was great: the gifts I gave resulted in excitement and appreciation, and I got some great gifts myself. There were lots of laughs and good times with my family, and I didn’t overeat to the point where I fell into a food coma or wanted to unbutton my pants – which have both happened in the past, many many times.

The gym I’ve been going to in Michigan was closed on Christmas day, but I had great workouts for the four days leading up to Christmas. After the gym on Christmas Eve morning, I went to Plum Market, an amazing local grocery store with three Detroit-area locations, for some last minute shopping for dinner that night.

The produce department at Plum is beautiful, and even though I only needed a couple items from it, I wandered the whole thing, and I’m glad I did, because I stumbled upon two new things that I’d never seen before.

Item #1 were finger limes, and in this case, it wasn’t the produce itself that caught my eye, but the price tag:

FIFTY BUCKS A POUND? For produce? Are you kidding me? All I wanted to do was toss a couple in my cart, but this boy’s on a budget, and I need to save some more pennies before making an investment like that! Usually I take a ‘buy now, research later’ approach to produce investigation, but in this case, I think the opposite approach is in order. I know, I know, they’re tiny, and buying one or two would only cost a few bucks, but still. I need to know what I’m getting into!

I’ve learned a little about finger limes since them. Todd, one of my Facebook followers (follow me on Facebook here!), told me about a wonderful iPhone app called Specialty Produce, which has all sorts of information on fruits and veggies (duh). Here’s what’s written about finger limes:

“Known as ‘the caviar of citrus,’ these tiny digit-shaped limes are practically in a category all their own. Their aromatic skin appears in a triad of colors and the flesh holds caviar-shapes vesicles that pop crisply in your mouth with an assertively tart punch. The flavor is a lemon-lime combination with herbaceous undertones.”

Another website describes them as having “A caviar-like appearance and… a delightful pop rock texture.” Pop rock texture? Caviar or citrus? Vesicles? Damn, I wish I bought a finger lime! I’m keeping my eye out for these when I get back to California. Have you had one? What did you think? Share, share, share in the comments section!

Item #2 were calamondins, and at first, I thought these were the tiniest tangerines ever:

Until I saw the signage – and look, they’re much more reasonable than finger limes!

If you’re a fruit with a nickname like ‘sour bomb,’ how can I not eat you? Plum Market gets big-time bonus points for this informational placard – thanks for doing my research for me!

See that part at the bottom about asking a staffer for a sample? Well, I’ll let you in on a little secret if you promise to not tell Plum Market management: I just ate one, without asking for permission. Shhhhh! Don’t tell on me!

Sour bomb is actually a perfect description – it’s like a kumquat on steroids. I definitely puckered from the sourness, but it wasn’t overwhelming. I liked it!

I did a little more research and learned that the calamondin is native to southeast Asia, and there’s some mystery as to its history. Call Nancy Drew! Scientists have figured out that calamondrin is an ancient hybrid, but they can’t identify the precise parent plants. It’s thought that it’s a mix of something from the citrus family with something from the kumquat family, but there’s a lot of head-scratching when you delve for more details.

Turns out the calamondin is a wonder fruit! Check out some of the ways (beyond eating and cooking) that the people of the Philippines and Malaysia use them:

  • Frozen whole, as ice cubes in beverages
  • Rub the juice on insect bites and abscesses to relieve itching and irritation
  • To clear up acne and bleach freckles
  • The juice, when diluted, can ease constipation
  • As an anecdote for poison
  • As an phlegm expectorant (when combined with pepper)
  • To remove ink stains from clothing
  • And, lastly, as a hair conditioner

And, like other citrus fruits, it’s high in vitamin C!

It’s been a good week for trying new foods. A few days ago, I tried moose meat for the first time, as well as apple pears (read my blog about both here), and now, I can add calamondin to the list!

Keep it up, David!


Henry Ford Museum

December 23, 2011

I’m back on the exercise wagon! A few days ago, I wrote about how unmotivated I was feeling to exercise, but I’ve been to the gym three days in a row, and I feel great. All three days I’ve done variations of the same formula: 5 minutes of cardio warm-up, then 30-40 minutes of weightlifting, then 15-25 minutes of cardio. One of my sisters has joined me at the gym for the past 2 days, and today, I was joined by both sisters. Three cheers for family workouts!

Yesterday I got a bonus workout: a couple hours walking around the Henry Ford Museum with my sister, nephew, and niece. Located in Dearborn, Michigan (adjacent to Ford world headquarters, and about 40 minutes from my parents’ house), the Henry Ford Museum is an enormous history museum (the size of 10 football fields, literally – that’s not an exaggeration) with a focus on technology, inventions, and transportation. The museum’s collection is vast and amazingly impressive: they have the chair from Ford’s Theatre that President Lincoln was sitting in when he was shot, the bus that Rosa Parks was riding when she refused to give up her seat, and, in the adjacent Greenfield Village, Thomas Edison’s laboratory and the Wright brothers’ bicycle shop (which were both moved, brick by brick, from New Jersey and Ohio, respectively). And those were all things that we didn’t see!

I brought a camera and got a few shots of some of the stuff we did see. Here I am, with my nephew Sam, in front of one of the original 1952 Weinermobiles:

They have an exhibit on early aviation, with about 12 or 14 actual airplanes on display, including this 1939 Douglas DC-3:

They have 5 Presidential limousines on display, dating back to the very first official Presidential vehicle,  which was used by Teddy Roosevelt. The highlight of this exhibit, for me, was the Lincoln Continental that John F. Kennedy was riding in when he was shot. It was humbling to be standing so close to a defining moment in U.S. history:

They also have one of the rarest and most expensive cars of all time: a 1932 Bugatti Royale. Only 6 of these were ever made, and its sticker price, in 1932 dollars, was $43,000. The last time one of these cars was sold, in 1999, it went for $20 million! Here it is:

The planes and trains and automobiles are all very cool, but I also love that the Henry Ford Museum has a huge display honoring domestic life. They have a big furniture collection, and tons of vintage appliances and electronics. They currently have displays recreating kitchens throughout time, and being a kitchen-loving dude, I couldn’t help but take pictures. Here’s a kitchen from the 1860s:

From the 1900s:

From the 1930s:

It will be fun, when I’m an old old man, to go back to the Henry Ford Museum and see a bunch of kids gawking at a kitchen from the 1980s!

I’d say the stroll around the museum equaled a couple miles, but with so much to look at, I never once thought about the exercise.

Keep it up, David!


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