Chicken Bacon Zucchini Twists

November 8, 2017

Look, I went grocery shopping!

I didn’t really buy three party-sized bags of Cheetos. I actually bought four!

Kidding, kidding. What I really bought were ingredients for a delicious and healthy dinner that my sister Laura and I made at her place in Chicago. Read the rest of this entry »

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Chicken with Mediterranean Sauce

December 8, 2016

I made a flavorful sauce the other night, and I’m calling it a Mediterranean sauce because it uses pretty much all the Mediterranean flavors. All of them.

My recipe was inspired by a recipe in Read the rest of this entry »


Chicken with Tarragon, Grapefruit, and Olives

June 23, 2015

I wanted to continue my little streak of cooking and eating citrus fruit, peel and all, so I came up with an easy, simple chicken recipe and tried it out on a couple friends who came to dinner. My recipe is inspired by a delicious meal my friend Katherine made in Sweden, which in turn was inspired by a Martha Stewart recipe. Leave it to me to mess around with Martha’s perfection!

It starts with Read the rest of this entry »


What’s In The RediSetGo? Part Twenty-One

January 14, 2012

Can you feel that magic something-something in the air? It’s because this is the first RediSetGo post of 2012! It’s been about three months since our last game of What’s In The RediSetGo, so we’re due. Don’t worry if this is your first time playing – you’ll pick it up in a flash. It’s a easy-sneezy game, you’ll see. But, if you’d like some practice (or some other ideas for how to use your own RediSetGo), then click on My Favorite Posts – all twenty prior editions of What’s In The RediSetGo are archived there, and I think you’ll find every single one is better than the last!

So what are we waiting for? Grab your helmet and smear some eye-black under your peepers, it’s time to play…

WHAT’S IN THE REDISETGO?

GRAPEFRUIT CHICKEN is in the RediSetGo!

This really couldn’t have been easier. I started with 2 boneless skinless chicken breasts, and marinated them for about 20 minutes in the juice of half a grapefruit. I also added in a few tablespoons of nonfat balsamic vinaigrette. I stabbed each breast a few times with a fork so the marinade would get all through the meat.

Yep, those are a few grapefruit seeds on top that my juicer didn’t catch. I made sure the chicken breasts were seed-free when I placed them in the RediSetGo’s divider pan (and they fit perfectly!)

Meanwhile, we got to work on a side dish. Oh – I never said who was helping! My friend Susan came over for dinner and some TV (we watched this week’s Top Chef and the premiere of 30 Rock). When we made the plans earlier in the week, Susan said to me, “Are you going to blog about our dinner? I really want to be on the blog. I want to be famous.” That’s a direct quote. I’ll see what I can do, Susan!

For the side dish, we decided on a quick and simple veggie stir-fry. Susan did all the chopping, and there was a lot of chopping. The veggies before:

And the veggies after:

There’s Susan! She’s a star! I hope this doesn’t go to her head, because what Los Angeles doesn’t need is another celebrity that’s always wearing sunglasses indoors and only drinking certain brands of water.

Enough about Susan, more about those veggies: that bowl has cauliflower, broccoli, zucchini, green bell pepper, mini yellow and red bell peppers, eggplant, and mushrooms. Susan also chopped up some scallions and garlic, but we kept them seperate.

The garlic and scallions went into my big skillet first, after we coated it with some cooking spray, and then we added all the veggies.  When they were most of the way cooked (about 15 minutes – it was a lot of veggies), we added some sauce:

This coconut curry simmer sauce (which I found at Whole Foods) has only 50 calories and 3.5 grams of fat per serving. We made a ton of veggies (so I could leftovers), so we added most of the jar. Oh, and here’s a fun fact about turmeric, one of the standard spices in most curries: it’s been linked to preventing and slowing the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Turmeric also aids digestion, and has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. A wonder spice!

Here’s our pan full o’ veggies ‘n’ sauce:

Once our chicken was cooked (which took about 13 minutes – they were thick) and our veggies were sauced, it was time to eat! The end result was delicious:

The chicken was tender and very grapefruity, and the veggies were flavorful. The coconut curry sauce was spicy, but not hot. Here’s Susan enjoying her dinner:

And one more picture, because I couldn’t not share it:

This was Susan’s first time eating curry (she loved it), and the first time for both of us eating grapefruit chicken (and we both loved it), and soon, Susan’s gonna experience her first class at Slimmons. She’s gonna really love that.

Oh, and by the way, the veggies were just as good the second time around. They made for a fantastic lunch!

Keep it up, David!


What’s In The RediSetGo? Part Eighteen

August 8, 2011

I haven’t given up on my RediSetGo.  It’s still not completely off my shitlist, either.  Even though I’m still pissed that the non-stick surface is peeling off after just a few months of use, I do have insert trays that I can use.  And since I’m continuing to use my RediSetGo (with less frequency), that means that your favorite blog-based game (and mine) isn’t headed to the retirement home quite yet.

That’s right…  it’s time to play What’s In The RediSetGo?  And this edition is super-special, because it also involves a brand-new (to me) item from the produce department.  NOPE – I take that back.  This edition is super-duper-special, because it involves TWO brand-new (to me) items from the produce department!

Are you a What’s In The RediSetGo first-timer?  Don’t get your undies in a bunch.  It’s easier to play than hide and seek, and, once you get the knack for it, you can go back and check out Parts One through Seventeen, which are all archived here.

So put on your sombrero and slather on some SPF 50, because it’s time to play!

WHAT’S IN THE REDISETGO?

SEA BASS is in the RediSetGo!  And it’s sticking to the lid!  (That’s what happens when I forget to spritz the lid with some non-stick spray.)

There.  That’s better:

The skin side was the side that stuck to the lid, and since I wasn’t planning on eating the skin, no harm was done, except for that the fish is a little less pretty.

Let’s jump back to the beginning.  I started with two pieces of sea bass, from the seafood counter at Whole Foods.  I asked the fishmonger to cut them into 6-8 ounce portions, and together they weighed about 14 ounces, so well done, fishmonger!

I did a quick marinade in a new salad dressing that I haven’t tried before:

I love blackberries, figs, and balsamic, so why wouldn’t I buy a bottle?  And a 2 tablespoon serving is only 15 calories and fat-free!  The fish sat is about 5-6 tablespoons for about an hour before going in the RediSetGo:

Meanwhile, I started work on a side dish.  Lately, I’ve really been into zucchini.  I’ve eaten it alongside chicken and built a salad around it – and I’ve been munching on it raw all summer long!  So, when I stumbled across these guys in the produce section at Whole Foods, barely a second went by before I was pawing through them and selecting some to bag up and put in my cart.  Have you seen these before?

The ridged ones are heirloom zucchini, and the round ones are appropriately named eight-ball squash.  I couldn’t find tons of info on either on the interwebs, but a few sites basically said I could use either like they were regular zucchini.  I also found an intriguing recipe that suggested stuffing eight-ball squashes like you would stuff peppers or tomatoes, so I will have to remember that for next time!  (I don’t think I’d stuff them like the recipe suggests, I’d just steal borrow the technique and devise a stuffing on my own.)

Here they are, getting cut up.

And into a pan, alongside an entire red onion, for a saute in cooking spray:

I also made some quinoa.  I followed the directions on the bag, although I replaced some of the water with the juice of 1 lemon, since lemon always goes so well with fish.  I also added generous pinches of dill and thyme, and 4 gloves of minced garlic.

My finished plate:

My annoyance at the RediSetGo disappeared when I tasted the fish, because it was cooked perfectly, and it only took about 8 minutes!  It practically fell apart into flakes when my fork touched it.  It was a touch on the bland side, though – in fact, the whole plate could have used a little sauce of some kind.  What I should have done is taken more of the blackberry & fig balsamic dressing and reduced it in a little saucepan, and drizzled that over everything.  Too bad I didn’t have that genius idea until the next morning!

The heirloom zucchini and eight-ball squash were delicious.  Guess what they both tasted like?  Zucchini.  Can’t say I’m surprised!

The RediSetGo insert tray was easy to clean (it can go in the dishwasher), and the fish was so good that I’m tempted to try to make other types of fish on the RediSetGo.  There’s tons of fishies out there that I’ve never purchased before – like the opah fish we tried in Seattle – so who knows what I’ll bring home next?

Keep it up, David!


Buddha’s Hand

December 12, 2010

Get ready – this post is gonna be a bit on the long side.  But there’ll be lots of pictures!

I went back to Plum Market today, like I said I would in my post the other day, and came home with a Buddha’s Hand!  I had never seen or heard of this fruit before seeing it at Plum the other day, but it might just be the coolest thing I’ve ever picked up in the produce section.

It is so cool that I need to show another picture of it, from another angle:

Here’s the skinny:  A Buddha’s hand is a variety of citron, which means it’s a citrus fruit.  It dates back thousands of years, and was originally cultivated in the lower Himalayas, in what is now northeastern India and China, where it is still considered a symbol of happiness and good fortune.  This particular specimen, however, was grown in California, and cost me a cool $5.99.  Buddha’s hand is very fragrant, smelling like a very pungent lemon, and a lot of websites out there advocate using it for purely ornamental reasons, as the aroma can fill a room for weeks and I know I could stare at it for hours.

But today I wasn’t interested in staring at it.  I wanted to eat it.  I read that you can eat it raw, peel, pith, and all, and a lot of people online recommended steeping it to make tea, infusing vodka with it, or making jelly or jams out of it.  But all that kinda bored me, so I decided to build a dinner menu around it, which I mostly made up as I went along.

First up: A side dish.  Baby red and gold potatoes, coated with a quick spray of Pam, tossed with fresh thyme and dried rosemary.  Here they are, ready to go in the oven:

Next I started a sauce.  First 1/2 an onion and 3 cloves of minced garlic went into a pot with 1 tablespoon of olive oil:

Then I started mincing up some of the Buddha’s Hand.  Here’s another fun fact: a Buddha’s Hand doesn’t really have any flesh – it’s all rind and pith.  Here’s what the inside of one looks like:

A few tablespoons of the minced Buddha’s Hand and some mushrooms went into the saucepot:

After it had cooked for a few minutes, I added a cup of white wine, although I forgot to photograph that step.

Meanwhile, I prepped a steamer to make the rest of the meal.  I cut up some more Buddha’s Hand to flavor the water I was using underneath the steamer basket:

Next the steamer basket went into that pot, and first, I steamed three boneless skinless chicken breasts:

After they were done (about 9 or 10 minutes), I pulled them out and piled in some broccoli:

The broccoli only took about 5 minutes to cook, and then, everything was pretty much done!  I pulled the potatoes out of the oven (they were in there for about 30 minutes total):

Then I started plating.  Everyone got a chicken breast, some potatoes, and some broccoli.  Some of the sauce, which had simmered and reduced the entire time the chicken and broccoli was steaming, went over the chicken and broccoli.  I garnished with some parsley:

Finished plate:

The verdict?  Very lemony!  If you didn’t know better, you’d probably have no reason to think lemon wasn’t used.  The sauce was good, but not great – I think I used a little too much wine in it, but my dad didn’t think so.  My mom was not a fan of the Buddha’s Hand in any way whatsoever.  She said she liked every component of the meal except for the sauce, and was a sport and ate most of it, and then had a small bowl of soup to cleanse her palate from the Buddha’s Hand taste!  My dad, meanwhile, had only compliments about the meal.  He and I also tried pieces of the Buddha’s Hand raw, and it was very crisp and crunchy, like a lemony piece of jicama or something.

Oh!  I never mentioned anything about the wedding I went to last night!  It was a fantastic evening.  My friend Laura, the bride, looked beautiful, and her new hubby Chad is a really nice, personable guy – I actually met him for the first time last night.  All the people at my table were old friends, a couple of whom I haven’t seen in a few years, and there was great food (most of which I sampled, calories and fat be damned) and great music.  After the reception was over, there was a little after-party in the bar at a local hotel where the out-of-towners were staying, and there was a little after-after-party in one of the hotel rooms.  It was a late night (out until 4am), and a wonderful one.  I’m ecstatic for Laura and Chad, and was so happy I could be there to celebrate.

I slept in this morning until 10am, and shortly thereafter I hit the gym, and for the first time since my sophomore year in high school (1995!), I had an all-swimming workout.  Here’s what I swam:

  • 2 x 200 yards freestyle (400 yards total)
  • 2 x 200 yards IM (individual medley – butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke, and freestyle) (400 yards total)
  • 200 yards kicking with a kickboard
  • 5 x 50 yards freestyle sprints, with 10 seconds rest in between (250 yards total)
  • 200 yards freestyle (cool down)
  • TOTAL YARDAGE: 1450 yards (that’s 58 lengths of the pool, as the pool is 25 yards long).

I sorta made up this workout as I went along, and I failed to note what time I started, so I don’t really know how long I was in the pool altogether (although I suspect between 45-60 minutes).  And while I felt sluggish and sloppy compared to when I was at my swimming peak 15 years ago (which is no surprise), I did feel wonderful afterwards.  I was exhausted and felt loose all over, and even a little sore.  I hit the hot tub for about 5 minutes, then headed back to the locker room.

Keep it up, David!