Yes, I Roasted More Beans. No, This Post Isn’t a Rerun.

A little while ago, I shared my easy-peasy recipe for roasted garbanzo beans. This post is another roasted bean recipe… but with different beans. So ignore that sense of deja vu, because this post isn’t a rerun. It’s more like a sequel. Or, to use Hollywood vernacular, it’s a ‘reboot’ or a ‘reimagining.’

The beans I roasted this time were black eyed peas (which are in fact beans and not peas). They’re a good source of fiber, potassium, iron, and protein, and they’re pretty low calorie: about 100 per half cup.

roasted-black-eyed-peas-in-hand

I wanted to buy them canned, but the store I was at didn’t have any, so I bought a bag of dried black eyed peas instead. At first I was annoyed, because I knew it would add a few steps to the process. Then I read that you get more of all those good things (as much as 25% more fiber, potassium, iron) if you start with them dried, so what started as an inconvenience became a fun project.

RELATED: Remember That Time I Bought Pigeon Peas at the Farmers Market?

While I didn’t know much about what to do with dried beans, I knew you had to soak them and cook them. Soaking can be an overnight affair, but I found a quick-soak recipe online that only takes 90 minutes, so I did that with about 8 ounces of dried black eyed peas. I then followed the cooking instructions on that same website (which took another 60 minutes). After all that, I had cooked black eyed peas – similar to how they would come out of a can.

EXCEPT… I overcooked them a little bit, so some were mushy, and many were losing their paper-thin skins. So I spent another hour sorting through the beans, separating out the skins and mush and setting aside the good ones. Top Chef provided a nice distraction for this task.

sorting-black-eyed-peas

The good beans got blotted dry between the folds of towel…

roasted-black-eyed-peas-towel

And then into a bowl. I added spices and herbs after roasting when I did the garbanzo beans, but this time around, I wanted to try roasting them with spices. So I added generous amounts chili powder and paprika and a pinch of salt, to give them a nice smoky kick.

black-eyed-peas-spices

Then about a tablespoon of olive oil, so help the spices stick to the beans, and I tossed it all together and spread them on a single layer on a baking sheet slicked with cooking spray.

roasted-black-eyed-peas-tray

They went into a preheated 375-degree oven for around 40 minutes. Twice during the cooking I shook the pan so they wouldn’t stick to it or each other.

Like the garbanzo beans, these were great warm, fresh out of oven. Crispy, a little meaty, and great flavor from the spices.

roasted-black-eyed-peas-in-tub

Bookmark this recipe and save it for December: black eyed peas are traditionally eaten in the south on New Year’s Day or at the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Eve. They’re supposed to bring good luck and prosperity for the rest of the year.

roasted-black-eyed-peas-closeup

I wouldn’t mind popping a few of these at the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Eve! (or any other midnight, for that matter.)

Keep it up, David!

Check out more more more more more healthy recipes on my RECIPES page!

—————————

Follow me! I’m @keepitupdavid on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Snapchat, and I’m on Google+ too! There’s also a “Sign Me Up” box on this page (at the top of the right-hand column) where you can subscribe to receive new posts via email!

Advertisements

One Response to Yes, I Roasted More Beans. No, This Post Isn’t a Rerun.

  1. Sybil Goldrich says:

    Yum!!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: