Kale Chips…in the MICROWAVE?!

February 19, 2014

This post is about food, and I need to fess up and say that my eating hasn’t been great lately. I’ve been exercising like a madman, and while I want to be capitalizing on the calories I’m burning to lose a few pounds, it’s not happening. But I’m not beating myself up over it. Just trying to make better choices and do the best I can.

Moving on…

A few years ago, I had a little kale chip kick. I was making them left and right. Kale chips, which are simply kale leaves that are roasted until they’re crispy like chips (see how to make them here), are very satisfying and super healthy. But Read the rest of this entry »


A Roasted Vegetable BONANZA!

January 14, 2014

Remember all those veggies I brought home from the store last week? I used a lot of them over the weekend, and I’m going to show you what I did!

I got invited to a small little get-together to watch the Golden Globes on Sunday. I gladly agreed to contribute a vegetable, side or salad, and I came up with something that serves all those purposes. And it started with roasting a ton of vegetables.

raw-vegetables-on-trays-roasting

Pictured above are Read the rest of this entry »


Holy Sh*t, It’s One Week Away!

April 15, 2012

My title says is all. My big stair climb is next Saturday and I’m terribly excited, for a couple reasons:

  1. So far, I’ve raised over $1,200 for an amazing cause, Whaley Children’s Center in Flint, Michigan. This is way more than I was ever expecting, and I’m blown away by the generosity of my readers, family, and friends. Your incredible donations spurred me to raise my goal on three separate occasions, and there’s still time to donate! Learn about my stair climb challenge and help me reach my ultimate goal – I’m $360 short – by clicking here!
  2. I’m ready for a little break from the StairMaster! My stair challenges have been ridiculously motivating, and all my time on the StairMaster certainly has made me feel prepared for them. But twice a week on a StairMaster, for two months, trying to outdo myself on every occasion… It’s exhausting.Exhausting in a good way, but still exhausting. I can’t wait to conquer next weekend’s stair challenge so I can give the StairMaster a rest for a little while!

I only have a week left to prepare for my second stair challenge, so yesterday I hopped on the StairMaster and had a great training session… and broke all my previous records, which were just a few weeks old!

  • DURATION: 36 minutes (previous best = 28 minutes)
  • CALORIES: 494 burned (previous best = 485)
  • FLOORS: 132 (previous best = 131)

This workout confirmed what I had already been thinking: If I’m going to make it 163 stories without stopping, I’m going to have to take is slow and steady. You’ll note that I only beat my floor record by 1 floor, but I stayed on the machine for 8 additional minutes, and that’s because I slowed down the speed and focused on endurance. After 36 minutes, I felt tired, but not collapse-to-the-floor tired (like I usually do), and that’s what I was shooting for.

And I get to add a new building to my Skyscraper Collection! Today’s tower is the fifth tallest building in the world, and in a country full of skyscrapers, but has yet to be represented in my collection. Say hello to the International Commerce Centre in Hong Kong!

With 118 stories, the International Commerce Centre is the tallest building in Hong Kong. Most of the building is office space, but the top 15 stories are occupied by a super-swanky Ritz Carlton hotel. The 117th floor has their Presidential Suite, which is 4,000 square feet and comes with a personal butler. The 118th floor features the world’s highest bar (cheekily called Ozone), and the world’s highest swimming pool. I’d take a dip in this, wouldn’t you?

After finishing on the StairMaster, I spent another 30 minutes lifting weights, so it was a fantastic day at the gym.

I’m continuing to stay on track with my eating this week as well – the little pep talk I gave myself a few days ago seems to be working. And I got some lean protein from an unexpected source – free in the mail!

Over a year ago, I wrote a post about trying salmon jerky for the first time, and because I enjoyed it, I mentioned how I wanted to try ahi tuna jerky, which I had seen at the store by hadn’t purchased. Last week, the Itsumo Ahi Jerky company reached out and offered to send me some ahi tuna jerky samples! Hells yeah! 

This stuff is good! It’s smoky and flavorful but not overly fishy-tasting. Check out their website – they were kind enough to set up a coupon code for my readers, so if you wanna buy some, plug in KEEPITUPDAVID during checkout, and you’ll get 10% off!

Guess what else I had in my kitchen for the first time? Chard!

Chard is a leafy green that I’ve had in restaurants, but had never bought before. There are a variety of colors of chard, and last time I was at the farmers’ market, I picked up some red chard. I thought it looked particularly beautiful:

Chard is a nutritional powerhouse, and a green that you don’t eat raw. I removed the thickest parts of the stems and tossed ‘em out, and later read that they’re edible, they just need to be cooked for a longer amount of time. Oops, my bad.

After chopping off the thick stems, I cut all the leaves into ribbons:

And I also chopped up a red pepper and a couple tomatoes, because I had them lying around:

I slicked my big skillet with non-stick spray, tossed in some garlic, and added the tomatoes and peppers. After a few minutes, I added the chard. I added a bunch of purple kale that I also picked up at the farmers’ market, because I wanted to use it up. That, too, was cut into ribbons:

I let it all cook for about 4-5 minutes, and then added some non-fat, low-cal balsamic vinaigrette and popped the lid on the skillet, so it would steam a little bit. After a few minutes more, my meal was ready! (If you haven’t cooked greens before, get ready – they wilt down dramatically. What seems like a lot of greens on your cutting board doesn’t amount to nearly as much when it comes out of the pan.)

A healthy, easy, delicious side dish! I should cook greens more often – I’d forgotten how much I like them!

Keep it up, David!


Roasted Vegetable Bonanza

March 23, 2012

When I looked in the fridge this morning, I noticed a ton of veggies that I needed to eat. They hadn’t gone bad quite yet, but the time was approaching quickly. I decided to turn on the oven and roast as many of them as I could!

First up, I still had some of the kale that I had purchased at the farmers market nearly two weeks ago. I had made kale chips with half of the kale last week (although I never blogged about it), and I thought it’d be easy and delicious to turn the rest of the kale into chips as well. Click here for my kale chips recipe. So, I piled the kale onto a baking sheet. You’re supposed to make sure they’re in a single layer, but I really wanted to keep the kale all on one pan.

Next up, two other veggies purchased at that same farmer’s market: asparagus and brussel sprouts. I halved the sprouts, so they were bite-sized.

Finally, some odds and ends: three zucchini, one red pepper, and one watermelon radish. I don’t think I’ve ever eaten a radish of any kind cooked. My friend Debbie once sent me a cooked radish recipe, but I never made it, and I think I lost the recipe. Anyway – I had no idea if a watermelon radish would taste any good after a stint in the oven, but I was willing to give it try.

All three trays went into the oven, preheated to 425 degrees, at the same time. I lined all the trays with foil, for easy clean-up, and sprayed the foil with a little nonstick spray. I didn’t add any other ingredients or oil, except for a little Spike (salt-free seasoning).

After 25 minutes, the kale chips were crispy and done, and the rest of the veggies had great color and were cooked through. I took a little bit of everything and made up a plate as part of my lunch:

The kale chips were light as air – and I mean that literally, because I took the plate to my balcony for the photo shoot, and the wind carried a bunch of them off. Oh well – I hope the neighborhood birds and squirrels and feral cats like kale!

Everything was delicious, except the watermelon radish, which was good but not my favorite. And I have two Tupperwares full of leftovers in my fridge!

Keep it up, David!

PS – Just realized that five of my last six posts were food-related – that might be a Keep It Up, David record! Did you read the other four?


Birthday Lunch AND Farmers Market

March 13, 2012

Over the weekend, I shared a few photos of food I’ve been eating lately – check it out if you missed it. Consider this post an addendum to that one, because I have more food photos to share!

Even though my birthday was on March 5th (read about the fitness challenges I gave myself as a birthday present), I didn’t get together for a family birthday celebration until two days ago, when I headed out to my aunt and uncle’s place for lunch with them and my cousins. Annie made a delicious meal that was light and healthy, and built around a protein that I had suggested: salmon.

Annie baked the salmon with salt, pepper, and lemon, and also sauteed brussel sprouts (lower left), and mushrooms (lower right), which went over quinoa (also lower right, under the mushrooms). A big ol’ salad (top), that I ate without dressing, completed the meal. Everything was fantastic, and I went back for seconds, without a second of hesitation or guilt.

For dessert, Annie made carrot cupcakes from scratch. Annie is an excellent baker, and it’s one of her favorite pastimes – so when she asked what kind of birthday cake I wanted, I opted for cupcakes, mainly for built-in portion control reasons.

I hope, by the way, that Annie is enjoying this post, because she only asked on about four separate occasions if I was going to blog about her meal. “Am I going to be in the blog, David? Because I really want to be in the blog.” “Are you taking pictures for the blog, David? It’d be so cool to be in the blog.” “If my face is going to be in that shot, than I should put on a little lipstick. I want to look my best for the blog.” You get the idea.

I ate one of the cupcakes, and it was delicious – moist and fluffy like cake should be, with big chucks of carrots, walnuts, pineapple, and golden raisins. Here’s what they look like on the inside:

“Are you getting my finger in that shot, David? I just did my nails – they’ll look really good in the blog.”

My birthday lunch was fantastic (thanks again, Annie!), but it’s not the only delicious food from that day – that morning, I went with a friend to the farmers market! It’s actually been over a year since I’ve been to a farmers market, and it was good to be back. So much gorgeous produce! I didn’t need much, but I still picked up a few things:

There are brussel sprouts at the top, asparagus to the right, a bag of sprouted mung beans, fenugreek, and wheatberries in the center, and a type of orange on the left that I’d never heard of before, called cara cara oranges. Like satsuma tangerines, cara cara oranges are sold with some of the leaves still attached, which makes them a beautiful addition to my fruit bowl. I’ll let you know what I think after I bust one open.

If there’s one thing that always catches my eye, it’s oddly colored vegetables, like the purple cauliflower I picked up recently. And the was definitely something that caught my eye at the farmer’s market… purple kale! And there were two varieties! There was this kale, that has purple veins:

And there was this kale, where almost the entire leaf was purple (I learned this variety is called nagoya kale):

I couldn’t choose which kale to buy, so I bought both. I think I’ll make kale chips with some (or all) of my purple kale bounty!

KEEP IT UP, DAVID!


Simple Kale Saute

November 12, 2011

Can I start with a few quickies? Thanks!

1) Thank You! Lots of gratitude to all the generous folks who opened their wallets and purses and contributed to my 10k fundraising. My friend Felise’s donation brought me to the magic number – $500 – but you can still give, so click here! All the money goes to weSPARK, which supports cancer patients and their families in the Los Angeles area.

2) Training is Complete. I’m writing this on Friday evening, and it’s official: my training for the aforementioned 10K is now complete! The race is Sunday morning, and Saturday will be a rest day. Today, I hit the gym, did 5 minutes of cardio warm-up, then 30 minutes of weights, and then I hit the streets again (mountain lions and bears be damned) for my final hill-training run. I stuck to the same hilly part of Burbank that I ran in the other day, but this time, I drove up and parked at the top of the hill, so my run would better replicate the route on Sunday, which involves running down a big hill first, and then running up it. In total, I went 2.1 miles in 23 minutes, and the uphill portion was .9 miles – whew! (Yep, I updated my running chart!) The next time I exercise, it will be at the race. Can’t wait! Oh, and I’ll probably be too beat to post on Sunday, so look for the race recap on Monday!

Onto the main event!

In the spring I went on a little kale kick. Kale was relatively new to me, and I fell in love with kale chips (which I talked about in this post and this post), and also created a pretty tasty kale and asparagus salad, too.

I haven’t eaten much kale since that kick wound down, but I picked some up recently, and thought I’d share my simple kale saute recipe. It’s based on Bobby Flay’s recipe, but with a modification or two.

Get a big skillet, spray it with some nonstick spray, put it on medium heat, and toss in half of a red onion, chopped, and 2 minced garlic cloves:

Let them cook for a few minutes, until the onion starts to get soft. Meanwhile, I hope your kale is already prepped! If you have a bunch of kale, clean it and dry it, and cut out the major ribs and stems. Or, save yourself the trouble, and buy a bag of pre-washed, pre-chopped kale, like I did:

This brand includes a little bit of shredded cabbage and carrot, but I don’t mind. I threw in 1/2 the bag – about 4 ounces – and then added about 1/2 cup of water:

I gave it a stir, so all the kale got a little wet, and then covered it. Since I wasn’t thinking and used a skillet that I don’t have a lid for, I used a baking sheet. Martha Stewart would be appalled, so don’t tell her. Pretty please.

The lid keeps the moisture in, so the kale will both saute and steam – which reduces your cooking time! In about five minutes, the kale will be done. Just like spinach, kale wilts down to barely anything, but what’s left is delicious. Transfer it to a bowl, and hit it with a few tablespoons of vinegar (I used balsamic). The finished product:

Healthy, easy, delicious. It’s a triple threat!

Keep it up, David!


Spring. Plus, a Kale and Asparagus Salad

May 23, 2011

It’s hard to get excited about seasons in Los Angeles, because there aren’t any.  But there’s a jacaranda tree right outside my living room window, and it’s in full bloom right now, and it’s gotten me thinking.

My grandmother passed a few months ago, and I delivered the eulogy at her funeral.  In it, I mention how powerful it can be when you first realize that spring has arrived – and when you live in Michigan, as my grandmother did (and I did for the first 23 years of my life), that’s a crystal clear moment.  When I was writing the eulogy, it occurred to me that, as an Angeleno, I might not have that epiphany this year, nor could I remember ever really having it in the nine years I’ve been in L.A.

I’ve had family on my mind all weekend.  On Saturday, I spent a lovely afternoon with my aunt and uncle from that side of the family, who were spending the week in San Diego and drove up to see me.  Then, yesterday, I had a nice, long chat with my sister on the phone, and as I was hanging up, the jacaranda caught my eye.  I put my phone on my coffee table, and just stared, for a good long while.  And that’s when it hit me, for the first time in years: spring has arrived, and it’s right outside my window.

I miss my grandmother.  I miss being 5 years old, when she would play “This Little Piggy” with my toes.  I miss wandering into her kitchen, and lifting up the lids of the pots on her stove to see what she had cooking – and she always had something cooking.  I miss her looping her arm through mine, so I could help her down the two steps from her front porch to the path.

This is the part where I somehow transition to the original goal of this post: to share a recipe I made this weekend.  I can’t figure out a good way to segway between these two disparate topics, so screw it.  Who wants to read about my kale and asparagus salad?

I’ve been enjoying kale a lot lately, and my kale chip posts (this one and this one) have been pretty popular, so I hope everyone likes this recipe, too!  I made it up as I went along, using what I already had in my fridge.

It starts with (surprise!) kale.  I found this pre-washed bag of kale (with some carrots and cabbage thrown in) at Whole Foods:

It’s a pretty small bag, compared to the other bagged salads in that section of the store, but it turns out the kale is packed in there.  It was a pleasant surprise when it filled up my big salad bowl as much as it did!

Next I minced up an entire shallot and added it in:

Next comes the asparagus.  My friend Jen told me last weekend how she had found a recipe online that called for shaved asparagus, where you use your vegetable peeler to slice raw asparagus into thin ribbons.  I love dealing with raw asparagus (see my raw asparagus salad here), so I just had to try it!  After chopping off the tough woody ends, I introduced the asparagus stalks to my peeler:

My new vegetable peeler slid through the stalks like butter, and soon, I had a pretty little pile of asparagus ribbons to add to the bowl:

That’s ribbons from about 8-10 stalks – about half of the bunch that I had in my fridge.

Next, I added some sprouted red lentils – about 1/2 cup or so.  They add color and some protein:

I also threw in some vegetarian bacon bits.  My bottle only had a few tablespoons left, so I just dumped it all in, although most of it was more like bacon dust than bacon bits:

Lastly, the dressing.  I thought something citrusy and light would go well with this salad, and I probably would have whipped up my own dressing had I had any fresh citrus lying around, but I didn’t.  So I turned to the fridge, where I had this bottle of dressing that I bought a little while ago but had never opened or tried:

This came from Whole Foods too, and each 2 tablespoon serving has 10 calories and is fat-free!  I poured on a generous amount – maybe 4 servings or so, since kale is hearty, and, in my experience, doesn’t get too soggy from dressing.  The dressing was good – tangy and refreshing, and the good thing about kale is that it’s better if you let it marinate for a while.  I planned on letting the salad sit for 30 minutes before I dug in, but I only lasted about 20 minutes.  See how long you’d last when you end up with a finished product like this one!

It’s so good it deserves a close-up:

I ate half of it for my dinner, and the other half is my lunch today!

Keep it up, David!


Orange Flesh Melon

May 22, 2011

Last week I brought home a new item that I’ve never tried before from the produce section at Whole Foods: An orange flesh melon.  I mentioned its purchase in this blog post, and shortly thereafter, a buddy who posts comments under a pseudonym posted this comment:  “MMMMMM. Flesh Melons.”  His goal, when he comments, is to make me laugh, and this one did the trick (most of them do, actually).  Seventh-grade titty humor gets me every time!  Since then, every morning when I saw the orange flesh melon sitting on my counter (it needed to ripen), my mind went straight to the gutter, and I tried to come up with a stupid pun or double entendre, along the lines of “David got kicked out of Whole Foods for squeezing other customers’ flesh melons.”  Stupid dirty jokes aren’t a bad way to start the day.  You should try it sometime!

Yesterday, the flesh melon seemed plenty ripe – time to dig in!  Here’s the melon:

See? An orange flesh melon!

After I bought it, I did some research on the interwebs and learned that the orange flesh melon is a hybrid between a cantaloupe and a honeydew.  The orange flesh is (obviously) a trait inherited from the cantaloupe side of the family tree, while the taste and rind comes from the honeydew side.  It’s also smaller than both cantaloupes and honeydews… although I don’t know if that’s true of all orange flesh melons, or just the batch that were at Whole Foods when I was there shopping.

Time to crack this sucker open!

The suspense is killing me!  Is the flesh really going to be orange?

YES, IT IS!  I scooped out the seeds, and gave it a taste:

Delicious!  It’s kinda bizarre, actually – I’m so accustomed to orange melon tasting like cantaloupe, but the interwebs was accurate – this orange flesh melon tasted just like a honeydew.  It was sweet and perfectly ripe, and I felt like I was getting punked by some farmers somewhere with every bite.

It didn’t stop me from eating half of it in a matter of minutes, though:

The other half is sitting in my fridge – it’ll be part of my breakfast tomorrow!

One more double entendre:  “Joanie always felt a little insecure about the size of her flesh melons, but still liked showing them off in the checkout line.”

A couple links before I wrap this post up.

1) This morning, my mom emailed me to gave me a heads up that they were making kale chips on “Down Home with the Neelys” on Food Network.  Since my mom lives three times zones ahead of me, I was able to tune in a little while later and watch for myself.  It’s basically the same recipe that I used in my recent kale chips post, with one notable addition: Gina Neely sprinkled brown sugar on them after they came out of the oven.  She said they counterbalanced the kale, since kale is naturally a little bitter.  Brown sugar on kale doesn’t sound appealing to me at all – and, as my mom pointed out, it didn’t really stick to the kale anyway.  But if you’re looking for a way to sweeten up your kale chips, give it a whirl!  You can find the recipe here.

2) Do any of you read Jack Sh*t, Gettin’ Fit?  Jack is a really wonderful weight loss blogger who uses humor to motivate himself and others, and he’s really funny.  He does a really inspiring recurring post called W.I.D.T.H (Why I Do This Here), where other bloggers and readers share, via photograph, the reasons why losing weight and/or healthy living are so important to them.  Guess what?  Yours truly is featured in this week’s W.I.D.T.H. post!  You can check it out here, and, while you’re there, look around on Jack Sh*t’s site – I bet you’ll enjoy it!

Keep it up, David!


Kale Chips

May 17, 2011

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about my friend and office-mate Maggie bringing in some homemade kale chips.  Maggie was inspired by watching Gwyneth Paltrow talk about them on The Ellen DeGeneres Show (watch the segment here; she also makes a vegan paella), and I, in turn, was inspired by Maggie.  So I made kale chips a few days ago, and I documented the process with my handy-dandy camera.

The first step?  Buying kale.  I recently bought kale for the very first time.  See?

I was super excited to buy this kale, and I bought these two bunches knowing that they were destined to be turned into chips, and yet they sat in my fridge, untouched, but about a week.  Kale is a hearty green, however, and so when the time came for the kale to meet its destiny, it was still in good shape.

I got out my cutting board, and laid out the two bunches of kale:

Each kale leaf has a thick stem going down the center that you don’t want to eat – so you gotta cut them out, one by one.  It’s easy to do:

After depositing the stems in the trash, rip up the leaves into chip-sized pieces.  No need to be scientific or exact – just rip big pieces in several smaller ones.  Then, you give the kale a good wash.  My kale was kinda gritty – so I piled all my kale pieces into a colander, and rinsed it all under the faucet.  If you have a salad spinner, use it!  I don’t have one (and don’t want one, either – just another kitchen device that I don’t have room to store), so I got out a clean kitchen towel, and rolled the kale up, and gave it a good squeeze, and than seemed to work pretty well.

Here’s the dry kale, in my new orange bowl that I got about a month ago:

I drizzled 1 teaspoon of olive oil into the bowl.  I have this basil-infused oil, and I actually don’t remember exactly where it came from… it was either given to me as a gift, or I may have won it in a foodie-related package at a silent auction a few years back.  Either way, I like it, and thought it’d work well here:

Most kale chips recipes also call for salt, but I try to cut out salt wherever I can, so instead, I tossed in some Mrs. Dash (table blend) and cumin, because I love cumin and thought adding a little smokiness might be fun.

One you have your kale oiled and seasoned how you want them, lay them out in a single layer on a baking sheet.  I sprayed my sheet with a light coat of Pam, just to be safe:

Into the oven they go!  350 degrees, for 20-30 minutes.  You want the kale to be crispy all the way through, but they’ll go from crispy to scorched quickly, so you gotta watch them near the end.  I pulled out mine out after 25 minutes, and about half of them were perfect, and half of them were a little too brown.  Not inedible, but not perfect, either.  Those not-perfect ones, interestingly enough, taste really similarly to scorched microwave popcorn; whereas the good chips taste so much like potato chips, you can hardly believe it.  They’re crispy, light, subtle, and delicious.

That’s the finished product in a Tupperware-type container.  I divided the chips between two of those containers, with the idea that I’d eat one over the course of the day, and take the other to share at the office the next day, but guess what happened?  I ate both containers, completely, before bedtime.  All gone.  And they were good.  And so guilt-free it’s ridiculous!  Oh, and I haven’t mentioned that kale is a superfood – a great source in vitamins A & C, copper, manganese, calcium, and a bunch of compounds that may help prevent cancer.  I’m going to keep making kale chips – are you gonna give them a try?

Keep it up, David!


Sneako de Scare-o (and Produce Infusion)

May 5, 2011

First things first: I’m on TV again today!  I’m in a tape piece on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” where Ellen, to celebrate Cinco de Mayo, scared people all over the Warner Bros. lot, using a hidden mariachi band.  Yep!  A hidden mariachi band!

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO.

Look for me at about the 1:10 mark: I’m walking to my office, carrying my lunch (salad bar).  Yep, I was totally startled, and as soon as it happened, I knew exactly who was behind it.  Enjoy!

Moving on.

Yesterday was another good food and exercise day.  I went to the gym after work, where I did 34 minutes on the elliptical (a lot of it pedaling backwards), and then 16 minutes walking on a 15 degree incline on the treadmill.  I don’t use the treadmill very often at all, as I prefer to walk or run outdoors, but it’s been a long time since I’ve incline walked, and since my neighborhood is flat flat flat, the treadmill was the way to go (and the only option at that time of night).

I also went to Whole Foods last night.  The last couple times I’ve been grocery shopping, it was quick stops where I just picked up a few necessities.  Since my fridge and countertop fruit bowl were pretty barren, so I was excited to completely stock up.  I’d say I did a pretty good job:

Starting at the top left and working clockwise, that’s a tub of spinach, broccoli, bananas, celery, a honeydew, a mini-watermelon, a cucumber, 4 Packham pears (an Australian variety similar to Anjou), yellow squash, 2 green peppers, 2 yellow champagne mangoes (more on these in the next paragraph), strawberries, braeburn apples, and mini-carrots.  This Whole Foods didn’t have any of my beloved yellow or purple carrots.

I didn’t know that there were different varieties of mangoes, did you?  I thought there was one kind of mango, and it was called a mango.  Wrong.  Here’s another picture of a yellow champagne mango:

According to the interwebs, yellow champagne mangoes are also commonly called Ataulfo mangoes (that’s actually what the sticker on my mango says), and they’re very popular in Mexico, and gaining popularity in the United States.  In fact, they’re the second-most-popular mango variety in the U.S., after the Tommy Atkins variety.

Which raises two questions:

  • Did you know that standard mangoes that you see in every supermarket are called Tommy Atkins mangoes?  Who is this Tommy Atkins anyway?
  • If Ataulfo mangoes are the second-most-popular mango variety in the U.S., does that mean that there are still other mango varieties that I haven’t seen yet?  Are mango varieties going to start popping up everywhere, like radish varieties?

I guess that was actually four questions.

After taking the produce group shot, I put all the produce away, and then realized that I forgot to include one of my purchases.  Oops.  I was too tired to re-stage the photo.  So I snapped a pic of this item solo.  Here it is:

KALE!

I’ve eaten kale plenty of times, at restaurants mostly, but this is the first time that I’ve actually bought it.  And, truthfully, I’m inspired by my own blog.  I recently wrote about my officemate and friend Maggie, who’s been bringing in and sharing kale chips, and now I wanna make kale chips too!

I’ll document it when it happens, and I’ll be sure to tell you about that yellow champagne mango, too!

Keep it up, David!


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